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Orchard Therapeutics: the Success, the Tech and the Potential

Founded only four years ago, Orchard Therapeutics has a deep pipeline of gene-therapy products. Late last year, the company went public receiving a valuation of over €1bn post-IPO, a status only achieved by 14 European biotech firms. Their early success, science-first approach and strategic partnerships, there are a few reasons why this is a company to follow closely in the next few years. 

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Connect2Innovate Special Part 3 - Would you eat lab-grown meat for dinner?

It has been a bumpy ride for RNA interference-based therapeutics. The protein-silencing phenomenon that shot into the spotlight with its 2006 Nobel Prize fell (aptly) quiet thereafter, suffering clinical disappointments and losing high-profile backing. But it is back with a bang: the first RNAi drug was FDA approved in August and a number of Big Pharma companies are striking deals with developers. Does this mark a watershed moment for RNAi therapeutics?

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How to navigate the jump from academia to a career in biotechnology: The UK Biotech Landscape

It has been a bumpy ride for RNA interference-based therapeutics. The protein-silencing phenomenon that shot into the spotlight with its 2006 Nobel Prize fell (aptly) quiet thereafter, suffering clinical disappointments and losing high-profile backing. But it is back with a bang: the first RNAi drug was FDA approved in August and a number of Big Pharma companies are striking deals with developers. Does this mark a watershed moment for RNAi therapeutics?

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Connect2Innovate Special Part 2 - Liquid Biopsy

It has been a bumpy ride for RNA interference-based therapeutics. The protein-silencing phenomenon that shot into the spotlight with its 2006 Nobel Prize fell (aptly) quiet thereafter, suffering clinical disappointments and losing high-profile backing. But it is back with a bang: the first RNAi drug was FDA approved in August and a number of Big Pharma companies are striking deals with developers. Does this mark a watershed moment for RNAi therapeutics?

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Connect2Innovate Special Part 1 - Biosensing & Interfaces

It has been a bumpy ride for RNA interference-based therapeutics. The protein-silencing phenomenon that shot into the spotlight with its 2006 Nobel Prize fell (aptly) quiet thereafter, suffering clinical disappointments and losing high-profile backing. But it is back with a bang: the first RNAi drug was FDA approved in August and a number of Big Pharma companies are striking deals with developers. Does this mark a watershed moment for RNAi therapeutics?

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RNA interference is hitting the market - Alnylam’s success heralds a new era for RNAi therapeutics

It has been a bumpy ride for RNA interference-based therapeutics. The protein-silencing phenomenon that shot into the spotlight with its 2006 Nobel Prize fell (aptly) quiet thereafter, suffering clinical disappointments and losing high-profile backing. But it is back with a bang: the first RNAi drug was FDA approved in August and a number of Big Pharma companies are striking deals with developers. Does this mark a watershed moment for RNAi therapeutics?

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Health Technology - The Digital Revolution: Part 2 Digitising Diabetes

Technological advances are permeating into the healthcare industry and are transforming the norns of patient care. The development of medical technology (MedTech) devices that can be used by clinicians, nurses, technicians and, most importantly, patients themselves is rapidly increasing. Such technologies are enabling greater access to patient data to monitor disease status and predict future health events. With tech giants such as Google and Apple diving into healthcare, only further acceleration of these patient-centred technologies can be expected, unlocking a wealth of patient data. Not only this, but the rise of wearables and mobile technologies has expedited the mass collation of health data.

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Health Technology: The Digital Revolution - Part 1: AI & Imaging

Our era is witnessing a technological revolution. Healthcare is becoming increasingly digitised, empowering both patient and physician. We’re using computational power and data to better predict, diagnose and manage patients with complex health conditions. In part one of this series we explore AI and imaging and the effects these have on the diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

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The Magnificent Seven Life Science Startups Hitting London this Summer

Exciting life sciences startups from around the world are kicking off their acceleration in London
this week. RebelBio, the world’s first life sciences accelerator and owned by SOSV, has taken
on seven companies for Cohort VI and they are working on some extremely innovative and
disruptive tech. Whether you are into sustainability in the food sector, artificial intelligence and
machine learning, neurodegenerative disease or the microbiome (to name a few) there is
something here that you’ll want to follow. These companies include science lovers from a range
of backgrounds, including BScs, MBAs, PhDs, doctors, surgeons, CEOs and visionaries, who
are being thrust into a full-on three month programme including investment, mentorship and
business training with RebelBio.

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Open Cell is transforming shipping containers into lab space in London

Looking for affordable office and lab space in London? - Join Open Cell

Join an exciting pool of talented scientists, designers and early-stage businesses in Shepherd's Bush Open Cell bio-space. Open Cell contains 20 containers for early-stage startups, 10 studio spaces and 10 fully equipped labs. The Open Cell aims to provide affordable lab and office space to create and foster an innovation-driven environment for the next generation of scientist-entrepreneurs.

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Innovation in the human microbiome

The human body contains trillions of micro-organisms, with an estimated 3.8∙10^13 bacterial cells accounting for up to 0.2 kg of body weight (Sender, R. et al., 2016). These microbes live within us in a symbiotic relationship and research has led to the understanding that they prove vital to our physiological functions. As vital as they are in remaining healthy, they are highly associated with causing or contributing to the development of many chronic diseases. These microbes are collectively known as ‘the human microbiota’ and the ‘microbiome’ is the term which describes the genes of all these microbes. The microbiome is unique to every individual and the extent to which it affects vital bodily functions is only just beginning to be really understood.

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Clustermarket: the airbnb for lab equipment

How many times you went around your department looking for a specific piece of equipment to use for just that one experiment? How many times you asked around your colleagues if they knew someone that had expertise on the new experiment you were trying to set up?

After the boom of “sharing economy”, in which people rent beds, cars, boats and other assets directly from each other, coordinated via the internet, for the first time we are able to book expertise, lab space and lab equipment outside our institution via an online platform: Clustermarket.

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