Posts tagged Life Sciences
Connect2Innovate Special Part 3 - Would you eat lab-grown meat for dinner?

It has been a bumpy ride for RNA interference-based therapeutics. The protein-silencing phenomenon that shot into the spotlight with its 2006 Nobel Prize fell (aptly) quiet thereafter, suffering clinical disappointments and losing high-profile backing. But it is back with a bang: the first RNAi drug was FDA approved in August and a number of Big Pharma companies are striking deals with developers. Does this mark a watershed moment for RNAi therapeutics?

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Motif Bio – Saving humanity one antibiotic at a time

It has been a bumpy ride for RNA interference-based therapeutics. The protein-silencing phenomenon that shot into the spotlight with its 2006 Nobel Prize fell (aptly) quiet thereafter, suffering clinical disappointments and losing high-profile backing. But it is back with a bang: the first RNAi drug was FDA approved in August and a number of Big Pharma companies are striking deals with developers. Does this mark a watershed moment for RNAi therapeutics?

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How to navigate the jump from academia to a career in biotechnology: The UK Biotech Landscape

It has been a bumpy ride for RNA interference-based therapeutics. The protein-silencing phenomenon that shot into the spotlight with its 2006 Nobel Prize fell (aptly) quiet thereafter, suffering clinical disappointments and losing high-profile backing. But it is back with a bang: the first RNAi drug was FDA approved in August and a number of Big Pharma companies are striking deals with developers. Does this mark a watershed moment for RNAi therapeutics?

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Connect2Innovate Special Part 2 - Liquid Biopsy

It has been a bumpy ride for RNA interference-based therapeutics. The protein-silencing phenomenon that shot into the spotlight with its 2006 Nobel Prize fell (aptly) quiet thereafter, suffering clinical disappointments and losing high-profile backing. But it is back with a bang: the first RNAi drug was FDA approved in August and a number of Big Pharma companies are striking deals with developers. Does this mark a watershed moment for RNAi therapeutics?

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Connect2Innovate Special Part 1 - Biosensing & Interfaces

It has been a bumpy ride for RNA interference-based therapeutics. The protein-silencing phenomenon that shot into the spotlight with its 2006 Nobel Prize fell (aptly) quiet thereafter, suffering clinical disappointments and losing high-profile backing. But it is back with a bang: the first RNAi drug was FDA approved in August and a number of Big Pharma companies are striking deals with developers. Does this mark a watershed moment for RNAi therapeutics?

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Start Codon partners with Clustermarket and Science Entrepreneur Club to support life science and healthcare start-ups

It has been a bumpy ride for RNA interference-based therapeutics. The protein-silencing phenomenon that shot into the spotlight with its 2006 Nobel Prize fell (aptly) quiet thereafter, suffering clinical disappointments and losing high-profile backing. But it is back with a bang: the first RNAi drug was FDA approved in August and a number of Big Pharma companies are striking deals with developers. Does this mark a watershed moment for RNAi therapeutics?

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Gain a Collaboration Partner with Merck Accelerator

It has been a bumpy ride for RNA interference-based therapeutics. The protein-silencing phenomenon that shot into the spotlight with its 2006 Nobel Prize fell (aptly) quiet thereafter, suffering clinical disappointments and losing high-profile backing. But it is back with a bang: the first RNAi drug was FDA approved in August and a number of Big Pharma companies are striking deals with developers. Does this mark a watershed moment for RNAi therapeutics?

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Business Plan or Business Wish List?

It has been a bumpy ride for RNA interference-based therapeutics. The protein-silencing phenomenon that shot into the spotlight with its 2006 Nobel Prize fell (aptly) quiet thereafter, suffering clinical disappointments and losing high-profile backing. But it is back with a bang: the first RNAi drug was FDA approved in August and a number of Big Pharma companies are striking deals with developers. Does this mark a watershed moment for RNAi therapeutics?

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How to navigate the jump from academia to a career in biotechnology: lessons from one scientist to another

It has been a bumpy ride for RNA interference-based therapeutics. The protein-silencing phenomenon that shot into the spotlight with its 2006 Nobel Prize fell (aptly) quiet thereafter, suffering clinical disappointments and losing high-profile backing. But it is back with a bang: the first RNAi drug was FDA approved in August and a number of Big Pharma companies are striking deals with developers. Does this mark a watershed moment for RNAi therapeutics?

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Mapping tumour evolution to deliver better therapies: an interview with Cambridge Cancer Genomics

It has been a bumpy ride for RNA interference-based therapeutics. The protein-silencing phenomenon that shot into the spotlight with its 2006 Nobel Prize fell (aptly) quiet thereafter, suffering clinical disappointments and losing high-profile backing. But it is back with a bang: the first RNAi drug was FDA approved in August and a number of Big Pharma companies are striking deals with developers. Does this mark a watershed moment for RNAi therapeutics?

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Biotarget Competition: Speeding up the race to beat cancer

It has been a bumpy ride for RNA interference-based therapeutics. The protein-silencing phenomenon that shot into the spotlight with its 2006 Nobel Prize fell (aptly) quiet thereafter, suffering clinical disappointments and losing high-profile backing. But it is back with a bang: the first RNAi drug was FDA approved in August and a number of Big Pharma companies are striking deals with developers. Does this mark a watershed moment for RNAi therapeutics?

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RNA interference is hitting the market - Alnylam’s success heralds a new era for RNAi therapeutics

It has been a bumpy ride for RNA interference-based therapeutics. The protein-silencing phenomenon that shot into the spotlight with its 2006 Nobel Prize fell (aptly) quiet thereafter, suffering clinical disappointments and losing high-profile backing. But it is back with a bang: the first RNAi drug was FDA approved in August and a number of Big Pharma companies are striking deals with developers. Does this mark a watershed moment for RNAi therapeutics?

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CAR-T cells and Autolus - Advanced Cell Programming Technology

Over the past few decades, there has been a new wave of cancer therapeutics, called immunotherapies, that are capable of activating the immune system to recognise and fight malignant cells. One of the emerging therapies of this type, which begins to enter the clinic, is the Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy. Here we explore CAR T-cell therapy and Autolus, one of the pioneering companies in the field.

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Health Technology - The Digital Revolution: Part 2 Digitising Diabetes

Technological advances are permeating into the healthcare industry and are transforming the norns of patient care. The development of medical technology (MedTech) devices that can be used by clinicians, nurses, technicians and, most importantly, patients themselves is rapidly increasing. Such technologies are enabling greater access to patient data to monitor disease status and predict future health events. With tech giants such as Google and Apple diving into healthcare, only further acceleration of these patient-centred technologies can be expected, unlocking a wealth of patient data. Not only this, but the rise of wearables and mobile technologies has expedited the mass collation of health data.

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Health Technology: The Digital Revolution - Part 1: AI & Imaging

Our era is witnessing a technological revolution. Healthcare is becoming increasingly digitised, empowering both patient and physician. We’re using computational power and data to better predict, diagnose and manage patients with complex health conditions. In part one of this series we explore AI and imaging and the effects these have on the diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

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Bioprinting: a myriad of (t)issues

Bioprinting uses 3D printing-like techniques to combine cells, growth factors, and biomaterials - collectively named ‘bioinks’ - to create living tissues that almost perfectly mimic their structure in the body. Bioinks are deposited layer by layer onto a supporting hydrogel, which functions like paper in conventional printing. However, unlike normal printing, the hydrogel dissolves once the product is mature, leaving it freestanding.

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Machine Medicine Technologies: A tale of AI in healthcare

Machine Medicine Technologies is a London-based digital healthtech start-up that has developed a mobile app that digitally detects the motor characteristics of Parkinson’s disease.

Lovingly named after the famous physicist, Baron Kelvin, who had a penchant for measuring things, the platform can be used on any device, be it smartphone or tablet, to record, store and analyse the motor function of Parkinson’s patients on video. Using machine learning, the software analyses a video clip of a patient’s motor function to detect motor dysfunction in Parkinson’s patients far more reliably than doctors can on their own. Machine Medicine Technologies, and Kelvin with it, is a prime example of the transformative influence of AI on healthcare.

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Climbing Everest: From Zero to One with a Life Science Startup

I spoke to Dr George Frodsham, founder and CEO of MediSieve, a startup seeking to revolutionise the treatment of blood-borne diseases with a novel magnetic blood filtration technology. He described his journey from a back-of-an-envelope idea to a £1.56m grant from Innovate UK, compared building a life science startup to scaling Mount Everest and offered some advice for those attempting the climb.

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Nightstar Therapeutics: Catching The Eye

Nightstar Therapeutics is a London-based clinical-stage gene therapy company developing treatments for inherited retinal diseases that lead to progressive blindness. Nightstar was born as a spinout from Oxford University, co-founded by Professor of Ophthalmology, Robert MacLaren. The company’s pipeline of therapies focusses on rare eye diseases that have no currently approved treatments, presenting a clear unmet medical need for patients. As a result, investors have been keen to tap into this potentially lucrative gap in the healthcare market. Indeed, since Nightstar’s initial public offering (IPO) on the USA’s biotech-friendly NASDAQ stock exchange market in September 2017, it has grown to boast a market capitalisation of $500 million.

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